taking a walk in india: photos | stories | essays

26 August 2015

One rank, one pension and the Iron Lady



In a nutshell: one rank, one pension means having a uniform pension for Indian defence personnel who retire in the same rank with the same length of service, irrespective of their date of retirement. At least 22 lakh retired military personnel and some six lakh war widows will become eligible for the scheme if approved by the government. The practice now is to fix the pension based on the Central Pay Commission's recommendations at the time of a person's retirement.

For example, a major general who retired in 1996 draws a lower pension than a lieutenant colonel who retired after 1996.

Here at Jantar Mantar in New Delhi, retired military personnel have come together to demand the one rank, one pension scheme, said to be one of the election promises of the Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A few ex-servicemen who are leading the protest have decided not to consume any food until their demand was met. Two of them had to be taken to hospital after their health deteriorated.

This could arguably be the first time that people related to the military have used fast-unto-death, a common form of protest in India against extreme apathy of the authorities, to seek a solution.  










A traditional headgear gifted by a social organisation to Irom Sharmila, at the office of human rights activist and lawyer Babloo Loitongbam, one of the first people to provide logistics and legal help to Sharmila when she started her protest in November 2000. (Photo taken with a phone camera during a chat with Loitongbam, Imphal, July 2013)

In another age and time, anti-war activist Irom Sharmila from India's north-eastern state of Manipur, decided not to consume food until her demand was met. Her goal is to make the government remove a law that gives sweeping powers to the military to act against suspects, including civilians, without trial in a court of law.

She hasn't eaten any solid food for quite some time, and her survival depends on for how long the authorities will continue to force-feed her.

Today, fast-unto-death is the crossroad where Sharmila meets her object of protest.


25 August 2015

Getting ready for Durga Puja


Artisans have started work on statues of Goddess Durga, her allies and sundry demons at Chittaranjan Park in New Delhi. Durga Puja falls in mid-October this year. The artisans are yet to start major work such as applying the base paint and chiselling fine lines to give proper features to the statues. The final coat of paint is usually applied two weeks before Puja starts. This helps the colours retain freshness.

The workers, all natives of West Bengal, come to Chittaranjan Park some three months before Puja every year. They spend most part of the first month taking stock of material. On the second month they start moulding the statues and making figures out of straws. The third month is the busiest as that is when pandals or fairgrounds get ready to receive the statues.    

The CR Park artisans eat and sleep at their makeshift workshop set up on a piece of land about the size of a tennis court, given by the local Puja organizers.























Part-I of a three-part series. See Part-II and Part-III.

21 August 2015

Seafood and sunburn in Hua Hin



Hua Hin in south Thailand, four hours by road from Bangkok, is a quiet beach town. Party place Pattaya to Hua Hin is like oil to water.


In Hua Hin you get seafood fresh off the boat. You point at the fresh sea creatures you want to eat, fried or steamed, and the cook brings it to you in a matter of minutes, piping hot.






A lady boy sells ice lollies. 


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Journalist. Taking a walk in India. | Email to journeybasket[at]gmail | Special thanks to M.S. Gopal | All rights reserved. No commercial use.

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